Free Educational Topics in Indianapolis

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  • 1300 A.D. social justice issues that causd the American Indian cultural collapse

    Greg Wright, Certified Fraud Examiner, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examineers

    The Southwestern (Anasazi) and Mississippian (Moundbuilders) cultures came to an abrupt end in 1300 A.D. Chaco Canion was abandoned. In today’s Illinois, what had been a North American city larger than any in Europe at that time was abandoned. Climate change was only part of the cause. Yes, this happened way before Columbus.

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  • Connecting youth with nature: The Bicentennial Nature Center Network at Conner Prairie’s Treetop Outpost

    Norman Burns, President and CEO, Conner Prairie

    Youth today spend less than half as much time outdoors as children did 20 years ago yet several studies have shown that children need plenty of time outdoors to live happy and healthy. Just as concerning, the average American child today spends at least 45 hours a week staring at some kind of electronic screen which has led to the appearance of what some are calling ‘nature-deficit disorder’ in many children. MORE >

    Along with expanding its outdoor programming opportunities, Cope Environmental Center, located in Centerville, Ind., has been reaching out across the state to ensure that every child in Indiana is within 60 miles of a partner nature center that will provide environmental education and creative outdoor experiences.

    Conner Prairie is a partner in the network and in July opened a new outdoor nature experience called Treetop Outpost. I'll share what this four-story treehouse surrounded by hands-on, immersive activities is, its intent to connect children and families with nature and how it fits into both the missions of the network and Conner Prairie.

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  • Cemetery Symbolism

    Jeannie Regan-Dinius, Director of Special Initiatives, DNR-DHPA

    Cemeteries tell us much about who came before us. The size, shape and documentation vary from religious groups, time period, and location. But, all are important outdoor museums. The symbols and markings that individuals put on their stones reveal much about the individual and family. MORE >

    Jeannie R. Regan-Dinius, Director of Special Initiatives for the Department of Natural Resources’’ Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, will discuss the state of cemeteries in Indiana, the presumed meanings of markings, how pop culture affects stones, and what you need to look at when you walk through a cemetery.

    Jeannie Regan-Dinius has a life-long interest in history, family history, and research. She earned her Bachelors in Public History from Ball State University, where she studied also anthropology and American Studies. She has her Masters in Urban Planning and Information Management/Library Science from Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis with additional graduate course work in public history.

    Before coming to the State, she was the Executive Director of a 96-acre historic park in Huntington, IN. She came to the state in 2000 to help work on the Underground Railroad research initiative. She was given the additional responsibility of the Cemetery Registry, the Historic Theater Initiative, and public outreach.

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  • Applying Benford’s Law to catch fraudsters

    Greg Wright, Certified Fraud Examiner, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examineers

    For several years, Greg has taught this course to Fraud Examiners and Accountants. Fraudulent numbers are invented numbers that can often be identified by applying special audit techniques. Recently, he has been conducted fraudulent number invention research in conjunction with Purdue and Ball State. This seminar is only presented to law enforcement and fraud auditors. MORE >

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  • The Underground Railroad in Indiana

    Jeannie Regan-Dinius, Director of Special Initiatives, DNR-DHPA

    As enslaved Africans tried to gain their freedom, many decided that their only option was to run north into states that did not allow slavery or into Canada. Many slaves escaped with no assistance, but others were helped by participants of what has become known as the Underground Railroad (UGRR). The UGRR was most active in Indiana between 1830 and 1865. MORE >

    The UGRR was neither underground nor a railroad. The UGRR refers to the network of individuals and communities that helped fugitive slaves. Sometimes the assistance was spontaneous, other times highly organized. Because aiding an escaping slave was illegal, the activity was usually carried out in secret.

    UGRR participants were diverse. Blacks and whites, slaves and freed, men and women from the North and South helped those searching for freedom. Food, clothing, shelter, guidance, and protection from slave hunters were given at a risk to everyone involved.

    Every Indiana community has oral histories about those individuals who participated in the Underground Railroad (UGRR), but the nature of the network sometimes makes it difficult to find evidence to substantiate the stories. A statewide initiative, the Indiana Freedom Trails, is working to confirm and document sites that can be definitively linked to the UGRR. Every day, researchers comb the archives in small historical societies looking for information about Indiana’s involvement in the Underground Railroad.

    Jeannie R. Regan-Dinius, Director of Special Initiatives, will discuss Indiana’s role in the events, talk about documenting stories, and offer suggestions you can use in your county.

    Jeannie, Director of Special Initiatives, has a life-long interest in history, family history, and research. She earned her Bachelors in Public History from Ball State University, where she studied also anthropology and American Studies. She has her Masters in Urban Planning and Information Management/Library Science from Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis with additional graduate course work in public history.

    Before coming to the State, she was the Executive Director of a 96-acre historic park in Huntington, IN. She came to the state in 2000 to help work on the Underground Railroad research initiative. She was given the additional responsibility of the Cemetery Registry, the Historic Theater Initiative, and public outreach.

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  • HISTORICAL EVENTS LEADING UP TO THE EXODUS

    Greg Wright, Certified Fraud Examiner, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examineers

    In the book, 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed, the world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes. No more Minoans, or Mycenaeans, or Trojans, or Hittites, or Babylonians. These cultures suddenly ceased to exist. These events help us understand Joseph being sold by his brothers and the Exodus.

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  • How crooks conceal their past and change their identity

    Greg Wright, Certified Fraud Examiner, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examineers

    Is your adviser a convicted fraudster that adopted a new identity following prison? Did a child molester circumvent your school’s background check? Greg will discuss U. S. states that have “closed” and “open” vital records, demonstrate how easy it is to “take” a dead person’s identity, illustrate how to produce “breeder” documents necessary to get a new U. S. Social Security number, show how some conceal the time they were in prison, and how crooks create a “new-skin” individual. MORE >

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  • Electronic Home Invasion

    Greg Wright, Certified Fraud Examiner, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examineers

    PROTECTING YOURSELF AGAINST IDENTITY THEFT
    This is one of Greg's most popular courses. An insurance agent stole 3,000 Identities of Indianapolis area professionals. Greg tracked this fraudster from youth to the fraud, to discovery, to prison and his post-prison life. He interviewed the fraudster while in prison, after his release from prison, his victims, the law enforcement officers that tracked him down, and his former wife. From this case study and the latest information, learn how to protect yourself from financial identity theft. One-third of Social Security numbers are being used by two or more persons.
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